Kochi: After the hospitality industry, now multi-specialty hospitals are tapping the potential of ayurveda. With an eye on medical tourism, most multispeciality hospitals in the state are setting up ayurveda centres on their campus. Ayurveda and yoga is being offered as an alternate method of treatment along with allopathy.With this, there is a growing demand for people trained in ayurveda, who now earn Rs 10,000 as starting salary after a one-year course after Plus Two.

“Our main concern is patient satisfaction and good healthcare. It is our job to provide whatever patients desire and ayurveda is an accepted and popular alternative medicine,” said VPS Lakeshore chief executive officer AK Abdulla. In the new block, which is under construction, they are planning a yoga and ayurveda centre.

Dr Shenoie Rajan, managing director of Ayurkshetra Ayurvedic Group, said that every year they admit 400 students who have passed Class XII for a one-year course. “Students are trained in yoga, nursing, panchkarma as well as spoken English as most of the clients are foreigners. Almost all of them are placed in ayurveda hospitals or wellness centres as soon as they finish the course through campus placement. The demand for trained ayurveda staff is so high that we even offer placement to students who have taken break after marriage or childbirth,” said Dr Rajan.

Added Dr PM Surendran, Prana Ayurveda Centre in Aluva, “More ayurveda institutions mean more competition, quality service and thus a benefit.”

Explaining the importance of ayurveda treatment during Karkidakam, experts said the effect of the moon increases the potency of medicines. Even as they welcome the popularity of ayurveda, they are against commercialization. “Commercialization is becoming a part of our life. But ayurveda shouldn’t be commercialized as emphasis would be on quantity and not quality,” said Dr KG Raveendran, medical director, The Arya Vaidya Pharmacy (Coimbatore).