The Swayambhu Shambulingeswara temple adjoining the Kakatiya fort was loved and patronised by the Kakatiya kings. People in large numbers thronged the temple to seek redemption from the cycle of life and death. The huge Nandi opposite the Siva Linga speaks volumes about the stone carvings of the 11th century.

However, the temple wears a deserted and abandoned look now, and has been the same since a long time. Only recently have people started frequenting the temple, but the number isn’t significant.

“Despite our representations for its development, the temple lies in neglect,” said Perumandal Madhusudhan, a resident of Shiv Nagar.

Legend has it that Kakatiya kings made Hanamkonda their capital which is located close by. In 1162 AD, the then emperor, Ganapati Deva, was passing by this locality when the wheel of his chariot was struck by a rock. Soon, it turned into gold.

Upon digging further, they found a glistening Siva Linga.

The emperor got it removed and built a temple. It proved to be a good omen for the Kakatiya kings, who ruled the area for 300 years. As gratitude, they reportedly built seven forts and 360 Siva temples.

Great importance

Mr. Madhusudhan said there were several such temples here. The Swayambhu Shambulingeswara temple was given importance and treated as the Dakshina Kasi.

Due to time, the temple lost its sheen and public patronage. The adjacent fort was also in utter neglect until recently when it witnessed a little development.

Former Deputy Mayor Kakke Saraiah told The Hindu that they did their best to prepare a development plan and secure funds for the temple, but in vain.

“A lot needs to be done to bring back the glory to this temple, which has great significance that needs to be told to the people,” he said.